Tuesday, December 22, 2009

IUCareers.com Spring 2010 Preview

IN THIS ISSUE:

* ATTENTION DECEMBER GRADUATES!
* UPCOMING INTERNSHIP AND CAREER FAIRS
* FEATURED JOB AND INTERNSHIP POSTINGS
* GAP YEAR EXPERIENCES: WHAT ARE THEY AND HOW DO I FIND ONE?
* artWORKS: THE BUSINESS OF THE CLEVELAND SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
* NETWORKING NIGHT SERIES
* GLOBAL CAREER SERIES
* UPCOMING INFORMATION SESSIONS

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ATTENTION DECEMBER GRADUATES!

Did you know that once you graduate you have access to career services through the IU Alumni Association? All graduates receiving their first IU degree receive one free year's membership in the IU Alumni Association, and as a member, you have access to a full range of services:

* Career assessments to help you choose a career
* Resume and cover letter builder
* Mock interview software that uses your webcam
* Information on finding a job domestically (40 U.S. cities) and internationally (27 countries)
* Industry research databases
* Job board with new jobs posted daily
* Almost 700 alumni who have registered to provide career advice
* Career counseling and job search coaching

For more information, go to www.iualumnicareerservices and click on "Overview of Services."

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UPCOMING INTERNSHIP AND CAREER FAIRS

INTERNSHIP FAIR
Wednesday, January 27, 10 a.m. - 3 p.m.
Alumni Hall, Indiana Memorial Union

IU BLOOMINGTON SPRING CAREER FAIR
Thursday, March 4, 12 - 4 p.m.
Alumni Hall, Indiana Memorial Union

View a list of participating employers through your myIUcareers account.

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FEATURED JOB AND INTERNSHIP POSTINGS

Don't forget to check the full-time, part-time, and internship postings on myIUcareers. Below is a preview of what is currently available:

Full-time positions:

* Sears Holdings Corporation, Kmart Retail Management Trainee
* Sunrise Greetings, Inside Sales Representative
* New York Post, Advertising Sales Account Coordinator
* WestPoint Financial Group/MassMutual, Financial Advisor
* Givaudan Flavors Corporation, Research Scientist (Flavor Science)
* Indianapolis Zoological Society, Conservation Education Visitor Program Specialist
* Enterprise Rent-A-Car, Sales/Management Trainee
* Maxim Healthcare Services, Healthcare Recruiter
* Steak n Shake, Inc., Restaurant Manager
* CIA (Central Intelligence Agency), NCS Language Officer

Internships:

* IU Radio & TV, Public Relations Intern
* Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co., Human Resources Intern
* National Children's Museum, External Relations Intern
* Indianapolis Zoological Society, Marketing Intern
* Peritus Public Relations, Intern
* JCPenney Co., Inc., Summer 2010 Merchandising Intern
* WFIU, Web Design/Development Intern
* Boys and Girls Clubs of Bloomington, Fine Arts Director
* IU Office of Creative Services, Web Developer Intern
* Sears Holdings Corporation, Sears Retail Management Intern

Part-time positions:

* IU Office of Overseas Study, Office Assistant (Work-Study)
* IU Office of International Admissions, International Admissions Office Assistant (Work-Study)
* Bloomington Developmental Learning Center, Support Staff Teacher (Work-Study)
* Indiana University Alumni Association, Research analyst/Developer (Non-Work Study)
* Sunrise Greetings, Outbound Service Representative (Non-Work Study)
* Bloomington Parks & Recreation, Child Care Supervisor (Non-Work Study)
* Salvation Army Bloomington Corps, After School Director (Non-Work Study)
* Indiana Memorial Union, Ass't Building Manager (Non-Work Study)
* Stone Research Services, Bloomington, P/T Telephone Interviewers (Non-Work Study)
* Campus Children's Center, Morning Teacher Aide (Non-Work Study)

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GAP YEAR EXPERIENCES: WHAT ARE THEY AND HOW DO I FIND ONE?
Wednesday, January 20, 6 - 7:15 p.m.
Ballantine Hall, Room 005

A growing number of students are graduating from college and pursuing "gap" experiences before embarking on a search for full-time, permanent employment. Join us to learn more about this growing trend. We'll discuss what "gap" experiences actually are and examine some of the organizations that house them (both nationally and internationally). We'll also provide useful resources to help you locate the best-fit experience for you.

Registration required through your myIUcareers account.

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artWORKS: THE BUSINESS OF THE CLEVELAND SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA Thursday, January 21, 10 a.m. - 12 p.m.
Oak Room, Indiana Memorial Union (IMU)

In this discussion, Gary Ginstling, General Manager of the world-renowned Cleveland Symphony Orchestra, will discuss his career and what it takes to manage one of the top-ranked orchestras in the world. Other members of the orchestra administration will share information on their roles and career paths.

Light refreshments provided. Sponsored and presented by the IU Auditorium and the Career Development Center.

Registration required through your myIUcareers account.

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NETWORKING NIGHT SERIES

This series allows you to learn the art of networking through interaction with professionals in specific industries. Panelists will discuss their career paths, organizational opportunities, and provide advice for students entering the world-of-work. Each event will also include an introduction to networking, light refreshments, and the opportunity to engage with the panelists. The Networking Night Series is a collaboration between the IU Career Development Center and the IU Student Alumni Association.

ADVERTISING, DESIGN, AND PUBLIC RELATIONS NETWORKING NIGHT Tuesday, January 26, 6:30 - 8:30 p.m.
Devault Alumni Center, 1000 E. 17th Street

SALES AND MARKETING NETWORKING NIGHT
Tuesday, February 9, 6:30 - 8:30 p.m.
Devault Alumni Center, 1000 E. 17th Street

WRITING, EDITING, AND PUBLISHING NETWORKING NIGHT Wednesday, February 17, 6:30 - 8:30 p.m.
Devault Alumni Center, 1000 E. 17th Street

NON-PROFIT NETWORKING NIGHT
Wednesday, March 3, 6:30 - 8:30 p.m.
Devault Alumni Center, 1000 E. 17th Street

Registration required through your myIUcareers account.

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GLOBAL CAREER SERIES

Join IU Alumni and career professionals who now work in careers that draw on their knowledge of languages and culture! Panelists will share their experiences abroad; provide tips on how to maximize your time here at IU, and offer strategies for Americans seeking international work. There will be time set aside to network with the panelists and other students with similar goals and interests. This series should be especially useful for students in international studies, area studies, languages, journalism, and other majors focused on global careers.

INTERNATIONAL JOB & INTERNSHIP SEARCH STRATEGIES Wednesday, January 27, 6:30 - 8:30 p.m.
Career Development Center, 625 N. Jordan Ave.

LATIN AMERICA & CARIBBEAN CAREER NIGHT
Tuesday, February 23, 6:30 - 8:30 p.m.
Career Development Center, 625 N. Jordan Ave.

SLAVIC & EAST EUROPEAN CAREER NIGHT
Tuesday, March 9, 6:30 - 8:30 p.m.
Career Development Center, 625 N. Jordan Ave.

AUSTRALIA AND NEW ZEALAND CAREER NIGHT
Tuesday, April 6, 6:30 - 8:30 p.m.
Career Development Center, 625 N. Jordan Ave.

Registration required through your myIUcareers account.

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UPCOMING INFORMATION SESSIONS

CIA INFORMATION SESSION
Thursday, January 28, 6 - 8 p.m.
Career Development Center, 625 N. Jordan Ave.

Learn about the exciting positions available right now within the National Clandestine Service of the Central Intelligence Agency.

National Clandestine Service careers offer fast-paced, varied work environments that will challenge you to find innovative solutions to complex problems, to travel internationally, and to use existing or new language skills in ways that will make a positive difference to you, your family, and your country. This is more than a job. It is a way of life for professionals who demand the highest personal satisfaction from their work.This information session will focus on overseas and Washington, DC-based opportunities with the CIA's National Clandestine Service (NCS). Agency recruiters will cover a broad range of topics to include the Agency mission, potential career opportunities, the on-line application process, and a question and answer period. Attendees are encouraged to bring a resume.

The NCS is currently seeking applicants with skills in Arabic, Chinese, Korean, Persian/Farsi, and Russian for Language Officer and operational positions. Applicants with foreign language skills or overseas study or work experience are likely to be most competitive for current NCS career opportunities. US citizenship is required. Visit our website at www.cia.gov.

Registration required through your myIUcareers account.

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For more information on these and other events, visit www.iucareers.com and sign in to your myIUcareers account.

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When you're looking for jobs, be sure to check the job listings (by using the "search jobs" feature) as well as the Interviews and Events tabs to find jobs that will have on-campus interviews.

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BENEFITS OF myIUcareers:

Participate in on-campus interviews for internship and full-time employment/Access online postings for part-time, internship, fellowship, and full-time positions/View the IU Career Development Center and Arts and Sciences Career Services calendar of interviews and events and RSVP for workshops and employer information sessions/ Obtain contact information for employers actively partnered with the Career Development Center and Arts and Sciences Career Services

Friday, December 18, 2009

New 400-level FOLK/ETHNO class being offered spring 2010!

FOLK-F 450 Music in Religious Thought and Experience

Daniel Reed
Spring 2010
R 9:00 am – 11:30 am
Course # 14053

This course will explore the relationships between music and religious experience and thought in select sacred musical traditions of the world. We will comparatively analyze pertinent issues including roles of music in sacred rituals, theories about and concepts of music involving the divine, uses of music as a means of communication with spiritual domains, uses of music in the negotiation of religious boundaries, intersections between American popular culture and religion, the effects of mass media on sacred musical practices, relationships between music performance and religious identity, music and religious ecstasy, and music and trance. Case studies will be drawn from major world religious traditions, local religious traditions, and combinations thereof.

Tuesday, December 15, 2009

IU Summer Camp Jobs Fair

Feb. 24th
11:30-3pm
IMU Alumni Hall (Over 60 Camps Attending)

Attention Students: Working at a camp is a great opportunity for IU students to enhance their transferable skills in communication, problem solving, leadership, and
event planning. Working at a camp can be an invaluable experience to have on a resume! Match your special skills this summer with a job that is fun, exciting, and offers you a valuable learning experience. Also this is a great way to get experience while having a PAID Summer Internship/Job! Visit our website to see which camps are attending.

www.indiana.edu/~campfair

A fun way to get an A&H - FINA N110 Intro to Studio Art for Non-Majors

This course is for non-art majors and is a fun way to earn your Arts and Humanities distribution credits.

Open Course for Spring 2010
N110 INTRODUCTION TO STUDIO ART FOR NONMAJORS
(3CR.) A &H
Non-majors are introduced to the visual language of the studio arts.
Students learn and apply the basic elements of design and begin to understand the principles of organization. Through the exploration of a variety of two-dimensional and three-dimensional media (drawing, painting, wire and clay) students become familiar with the basic techniques used to develop art works.

Courses: Fine Arts Bldg. Rm 145
Monday, Wednesday 9:05 - 12:05pm
12:20 - 3:20pm

Tuesday, Thursday 11:15 - 2:15 pm
2:30 - 5:30 pm
5:45 - 8:45 pm
For more information contact Amy Norgaard, anorgaar@indiana.edu

HHC Symposium & Research Fair

The Hutton Honors College presents
the 2010 Annual IUB Undergraduate
Symposium and Research Fair
April 10th, 9:00-5:00

Deadline for abstracts & proposals March 1st, 2010
Submit to Assistant Dean, Lynn Cochran (lcochran@indiana.edu)

The Hutton Honors College invites proposals and abstracts for our annual symposium and research fair. The symposium is to be held on Saturday, April 10th, in the new Hutton Honors College building (811 East 7th Street) from 9-5. Students who choose to present papers at the symposium will be asked to speak for ten minutes on their work, with a five minute Q&A to follow. Each presenter will be included on a panel of students working in a similar field of study. Last year the topics included sociology, international issues, science, psychology, health care, and arts and humanities. Every year the topics vary somewhat according to the abstracts submitted. A schedule of sessions will be forthcoming in March. The poster fair will also be held on Saturday, April 10th. Students are invited to present both a paper and/or poster; presentations of both a paper and poster are especially welcome. All IU undergraduates are invited to participate in these two events, and all IU faculty and students will be invited to attend. The Hutton Honors College will hold workshops for students who would like to know more about paper or poster presentations.

Whether you choose to present a paper at the symposium or a poster at the fair, or would like to participate in both events, we welcome one page abstracts by March 1st. Please be sure to indicate whether you are interested in presenting a paper and/or a poster. If you choose to participate in both events, you will just submit one abstract. Please let me know at your earliest convenience if you will be submitting an abstract this year and we will send you an abstract template to make your submission easier. Also, be sure you have a faculty mentor for your project, as they will be asked to sign off on your abstract.

The symposium and fair are open to all disciplines, including (but not limited to): visual and performing arts, humanities, social and behavioral sciences, public affairs, natural and physical sciences, mathematics, business and economics, education, and nursing. This is a great opportunity to let others see the valuable work you have accomplished during the past year, and to see what other students in a variety of fields are exploring here at IU. It is also a great chance for you to perfect your presentation skills and receive valuable feedback from faculty and interested colleagues. Don’t miss this opportunity for professional experience!

We look forward to hearing from you, and more importantly, to seeing the results of your efforts!

Lynn Cochran

Assistant Dean
Hutton Honors College
811 E. 7th Street
Bloomington, IN, 47405
(812) 855-3554

Friday, December 11, 2009

New JOUR-J 261, Wordsmithing course in Spring 2010, 2nd 8 weeks

Journalism has added a new course for spring, meeting 2nd 8 weeks. The course is open to all students, including majors and pre-journalism students. Please let interested students know.

It will count as one of the required 14 credits of Journalism electives in the degree, if you are working with pre-journalism students.

Here are the details:

JOUR-J 261, 31319, second 8 weeks. 11:15 am to 12:30 pm, M/W, Ernie Pyle 214. Taught by Professor Bonnie Brownlee. 2 credits.

Description: Wordsmithing: grammar, usage, punctuation & journalism style. Workshop on the mechanics of writing and editing. The course builds on the basics, focuses on the practical and strengthens your confidence as a practitioner.

Please contact me if questions.

Thank you,
Jean Person, Recorder
Journalism
855-1698
jperson@indiana.edu

Thursday, December 10, 2009

Asian American Studies (culture studies) Courses spring 2010

There are still seats available in the following Spring 2010 Asian American Studies courses. All carry College of Arts and Sciences Culture Studies credit:

AAST-A300 Topics in Asian American Studies (3 cr.) (CSA)
Topic: Social Problems in the Health and Wellbeing of Asian America
Instructor: Professor Fernando Ona
Section: 29654
TR 1-2:15 p.m. ME 008
This course serves as part of the Asian American Studies minor, and as such it presents the major themes and issues in a new and growing interdisciplinary field of scholarly research and cultural production. The primary objective of the course is to engage students with selected aspects of the emerging canon of scholarly literature in Asian American Studies, specifically social and health problems that face Asian America. This class will critically examine the nature and characteristics of social problems in health and well being that Asian Americans experience and engage with theoretical frameworks for understanding such social problems. The course will review potential solutions to these issues and discuss current approaches to public health interventions that attempt to address these challenges. An empirical overview of health disparities and social injustices that face Asian America will be examined using case studies (i.e. health inequities regarding access to health care, statistical “insignificance” of Asian populations in the United States, poverty in Asian America, cultural competency in health, disease stigma, mental health, STIs/HIV, infectious and chronic diseases.

This course will also provide many opportunities for students to link personal experiences to the larger collective facts of “Asian America,” from the local to the global. Additionally, a service-research project to examine the experience of Asian Americans in the Midwest will take place during the semester. This will provide students with the opportunity to conduct a mini-research project that attempt to address social and health problems that Asian Americans experience. Students will be required to participate in analyzing and writing reseatch data into a potential peer-review publication to be submitted at the end of the semester. The course will shed light not only on the multi-faceted nature of the Asian American experience, but also on the conflicting and simultaneous trends within the field of Asian American Studies.

AAST-A300 Topics in Asian American Studies (3 cr.) (CSA)
Topic: Playing with Difference: Popular Cultures of Asia in America
Instructor: Karen Inouye
Section: 30920
TR 11:15a-12:30p BH233
This course examines how and why Asian cultures have become so prevalent in American popular culture. Topics include Hong Kong cinema, anime, so-called fusion cuisine, video games, martial arts, and yoga. This course is joint listed with AMST A350.

SOC S342 Asian American Communities and Identities (3 cr.) (CSA) (S & H)
Instructor: Jennifer Lee
TR 2:30P-03:45P BH 330
This course takes a sociological approach to examine the histories, experiences, and cultures that shape Asian American communities and identities. Using materials from academic articles and books, as well as popular films and novels, students will first review the history of Asian Americans in the United States in order to situate the Asian American experience within broader social and historical contexts and to highlight the diversity of Asian American communities and families. Then, students will examine the experiences of second and higher generation Asian Americans in order to address questions about who is viewed as American and how Asian Americans establish and maintain their ethnic identities. For one of the papers, students will get the option of writing something creative, perhaps a short story or a poem or two. Students will create their own Asian American literature!

Monday, December 7, 2009

New Spring 2010 Journalism Course for Non-majors: What The News Won’t Tell You

JOUR-C 201, 29520, 11:15 am -12:30 pm, T R, EP 220. Professor Michael Evans

Topic: What The News Won’t Tell You

What the News Won’t Tell You
A course in media literacy

What the News Won’t Tell You will help you develop basic skills in media literacy. Americans are bombarded with media messages that have been carefully crafted, honed, and delivered. This course will help students understand the intentions behind those messages and the techniques used to make them effective.

The course is not intended for Journalism majors, but rather intended to help other students on campus learn to detect, decode, and understand the kinds of messages being placed before them throughout every day of their lives.
• Advertising (for example: why are TV commercials so annoying?)
• Public Relations (how do companies get themselves on the news?)
• Product Placement (why does Tine Fey drink Snapple?)
• News Values (how do editors decide what news to run?)
• The Entertainment Industry (how are the Oscar-winners really chosen?)
• The Media and Body Image (Kate Moss: “Nothing tastes as good as skinny feels.”)
• Talk Radio (Obnoxious and successful)
• and others.
What the News Won’t Tell You is being taught by award-winning instructor Michael Evans, who also is an Associate Dean at the School of Journalism.

Friday, December 4, 2009

New PACE course in spring

Interested in learning and developing skills for effective citizenship? Here’s a great opportunity to take a new class designed to use innovative methods of engaged learning (academic and experiential). Prof. Mike Grossberg (History and Law, director of the new PACE certificate program) and Dr. Lisa Marie Napoli have prepared an exciting agenda to kick off the new program in Political And Civic Engagement. http://pace.indiana.edu Enrollment in PACE-C 211 is now open to any student.

PACE-C 211 Public Decision Making in America (3 cr.) S & H. Interdisciplinary introduction to public decision making in America from local communities to national policies. The course will cover both theories and real-life examples of the wide array of issues, people, institutions, and organizations involved in creating effective democratic decisions. Students will gain an understanding of American political and civic culture while being introduced to skills of participatory decision making, representative democracy, and citizen education and engagement.

You may contact pace@indiana.edu with any questions.

CIA INFORMATION SESSION

Thursday, January 28, 2010 • 6:00 p.m. - 7:30 p.m.
Career Development Center, 625 N. Jordan Ave.

Registration required through your myIUcareers account.

Learn about the exciting positions available right now within the National Clandestine Service of the Central Intelligence Agency.

National Clandestine Service careers offer fast-paced, varied work environments that will challenge you to find innovative solutions to complex problems, to travel internationally, and to use existing or new language skills in ways that will make a positive difference to you, your family, and your country. This is more than a job. It is a way of life for professionals who demand the highest personal satisfaction from their work.

This information session will focus on overseas and Washington, DC-based opportunities with the CIA's National Clandestine Service (NCS). Agency recruiters will cover a broad range of topics to include the Agency mission, potential career opportunities, the on-line application process, and a question and answer period.

Attendees are encouraged to bring a resume.

Applicants with foreign language skills or overseas study or work experience are likely to be most competitive for current NCS career opportunities. US citizenship is required.

Visit our website: www.cia.gov

The NCS is currently seeking applicants with skills in Arabic, Chinese, Korean, Persian/Farsi, and Russian for Language Officer and operational positions.

Final Themester 2009 lecture

Lecture: Friday, December 4, at 4:00 p.m. in Whittenberger Auditorium, IMU

Speaker: Judge John E. Jones III

Topic: "Judicial Independence and the Pennsylvania Case of Intelligent Design
in the Public Schools”

Judge Jones is perhaps best known by many for presiding over the 2005 landmark case of Kitzmiller v. Dover School District, after which he held that it was unconstitutional to teach intelligent design within a public school science curriculum.

Below is a small excerpt from his biographical sketch:
"In 2003 Judge Jones struck down portions of Shippensburg University’s speech code on the basis that they violated the First Amendment’s free speech guarantee. In that same year Judge Jones ruled, in a decision later affirmed by the United States Supreme Court, that the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s statute assessing milk producers in order to fund advertising, including the Milk Mustache/got milk® campaign did not infringe the free speech rights of the producers. In 2005 Judge Jones presided over the landmark case of Kitzmiller v. Dover School District, after which he held that it was unconstitutional to teach intelligent design within a public school science curriculum. In 2006 he ruled that the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania’s ballot access procedures for minor political parties did not violate the Constitution.

In 2007 Judge Jones and the Kitzmiller case were featured in the two-hour Nova special “Judgment Day: Intelligent Design on Trial,” televised nationally by PBS. In April 2008 “Judgment Day” won a Peabody Award, which is the oldest and most distinguished honor in electronic media. Judge Jones has also appeared as a guest on national television shows such as Today on NBC, the NewsHour on PBS, and C-SPAN’s America & The Courts."

We are honored to have Judge Jones on the IU campus to help us conclude our inaugural Themester of “Evolution, Diversity and Change”.

Wednesday, December 2, 2009

New CJUS course this spring: DEVELOPMENTAL CRIMINOLOGY

NEW COURSE!!!

SPRING 2010

IU Department of Criminal Justice

P493: DEVELOPMENTAL CRIMINOLOGY

To learn more about the:

• Trajectories of antisocial behavior and offending
• Bio-psychosocial risk factors, including:
o Personality traits
o Parenting
o Prenatal and perinatal influences
o Peers
o Neighborhood
• Effects of life events and turning points on the course of development
• Gender differences in antisocial behavior
• Protective factors and resilience
• Gene-environment interplay
• Intergenerational transmission of aggression and antisocial behavior
• Intervention and prevention strategies

Course information:

DEVELOPMENTAL CRIMINOLOGY
26432 RSTR 05:45P-07:00P TR SY 210 Fontaine N

Professor information:
Nathalie Fontaine
Ph.D., University of Montreal (Criminology)
Assistant Professor
nfontain@indiana.edu
(812) 855-4285
Sycamore Hall, Room 319
Research area: Developmental criminology and psychopathology; prevention and intervention of antisocial behavior and related adjustment problems; gender and antisocial behavior; callous-unemotional traits; longitudinal and experimental designs.

Nathalie received her Ph.D. from the School of Criminology at the University of MontrĂ©al (Canada) in 2007. She received a postdoctoral fellowship (2007-2008) from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada to conduct research in the Division of Psychology and Language Sciences, University College London (U.K.), the School of Psychology, Laval University (Canada) and the MRC Social, Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry Research Centre, Institute of Psychiatry, King’s College London (U.K.). Her research in developmental criminology is multidisciplinary and has been published in high impact journals (e.g., Archives of General Psychiatry, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry). She has a special interest in translational research, applying basic science findings to applied and clinical settings. Her research concerns the development and the prevention of antisocial behavior and related disorders (i.e., substance use problems) using longitudinal and experimental designs. Recently, she has focused on the study of callous-unemotional traits in children, a potential risk factor for psychopathy in adulthood. She is currently integrating twin model-fitting and brain imaging in her research to study developmental criminology and psychopathology. She has also taken a lead in designing and conducting a novel fMRI study of cognitive and emotional empathy in adolescents and adults during her appointment at University College London.

ANTH field school information session (Summer 2010)

*INFORMATION SESSION: Tuesday January 19th, 7 pm, SB 150

SUMMER 2010 FIELD SCHOOLS
Anthropology Department, Indiana University

Archaeological Field School in Montana & Wyoming
Exploring Historical and Social Landscapes of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem
May 19 to June 30, 6 credits P405, Prof. Laura Scheiber
This is the 6th cooperative program in archaeological field methods in the beautiful Bighorn and Absaroka Mountain ranges of Montana and Wyoming. This field school is a holistic, field-based program in the social history and human ecology of the northwestern High Plains and Middle Rocky Mountains with a special emphasis on the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. If you like camping, hiking, and archaeology, this field school is for you!
APPLICATION DEADLINE: March 12, contact scheiber@indiana.edu

Archaeological Field School in Indiana
Solving the Mystery of Yankeetown
First summer session, 6 credits P405, Prof. Susan Alt
Join a team of archaeologists trying to solve an archaeological mystery! Excavations will be designed to discover how Yankeetown people organized their towns and built their houses. This field school is the beginning of a large scale project designed to better understand how interactions between different groups of people led to culture change, innovation, religious movements, and violent conflict.
APPLICATION DEADLINE: TBA, contact susalt@indiana.edu

Anthropology Field Program in Mexico (with IU Overseas Study)
Heritage and Cultural Diversity in Oaxaca, Mexico
May 17 to June 7, 3 credits A406, Profs. Stacie King, Anya Royce, and Dan Suslak
This program will introduce students to the research process in anthropology on the topics of heritage and cultural patrimony, linguistic change, cultural diversity, economic revitalization and human-environment interactions in historic Oaxaca, Mexico. Students will visit museums, archives, archaeological sites, markets and arts events in Oaxaca City and will travel outside the city to visit field research sites in the mountains of the Sierra Mixe, mid-elevation Nejapa, and the coastal Isthmus of Tehuantepec and Puerto Escondido.

APPLICATION DEADLINE: February 1, contact dsuslak@indiana.edu

For more information, contact the faculty directors, or:
Stacie King, kingsm@indiana.edu, Professor, Anthropology
Kim Hinton, kishinto@indiana.edu, Undergraduate Adviser for Anthropology
April Sievert, asievert@indiana.edu, Director of Undergraduate Studies, Anthropology

Great Study Abroad Opportunity for CMCL Majors in Canterbury!

I am writing to tell you about a great study abroad opportunity available to students in the CMCL department. IU administers an academic year program at the University of Kent in Canterbury, England where students are directly enrolled at a British university and take classes with British students. The University of Kent is situated about one hour southeast of London in the midst of a famous cathedral city and picturesque villages. The academic year program in Kent is designed for students to pursue their major or minor area(s) of study.

For instance, some courses (called modules at Kent) that students in your department have recently completed and received credit for on the Canterbury program are listed below. You can also consult Kent’s catalogues of modules at http://www.kent.ac.uk/studying/short-term/programmes/index.html for more specific information on classes offered such as their descriptions, length, etc.

CMCL C 326 Authorship in the Media
CMCL C 392 Media Genres
CMCL C 410 Media Theory
CMCL C 420 Topics in Media History

And many more!

The Office of Overseas Study is doing an academic year promotion and we would appreciate it if you could please forward this email to students in your department. For general information about the program, eligibility requirements and application procedures, students can view our Canterbury poster and webflyer (link below red poster) at http://www.indiana.edu/~overseas/programs/ay.shtml.

The deadline for applications is Tuesday, January 19, 2010.

Best,
Casey

Casey L. Vargo I Study Abroad Advisor
Office of Overseas Study, Indiana University
Franklin Hall 303
Appointments: +1 (812) 855-9304
Phone: +1 (812) 855-5607
Fax: +1 (812) 855-6452
clvargo@indiana.edu
http://www.indiana.edu/~overseas